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estate administration and probate Archives

Who is best suited to see an estate through probate?

Settling a recently deceased individual's estate is a difficult task. The process can be long, stressful and require a lot of work. Many people are not cut out to take on the role of executor and see a Florida estate through probate, and that is not necessarily a bad thing. However, it does mean that it is important for individuals to choose the right executors for their estates.

Handling probate after a parent's passing can be challenging

Even if a parent created an estate plan, closing his or her Florida estate can be a complicated affair. The executor will need to find those documents, go over the instructions, file the proper paperwork with the court and carry out a number of other important tasks. It can be overwhelming at times, but completing probate is a necessary task.

Beneficiaries are important to the probate process

Many Florida residents want to take something from a recently deceased loved one's estate. However, according to law, individuals cannot just take what they want after a person's passing. Even if a person is named as a beneficiary, he or she may need to wait until property distribution takes place as part of the probate process.

Executors may have questions about probate proceedings

Having questions about closing a deceased individual's estate is understandable. Many Florida residents likely have not had to handle probate proceedings until the death of a close loved one. Being put into the role of executor can have its challenges, and understanding the legal process ahead can be useful.

Estate administration dispute involves Chris Cornell's daughter

Handling the final affairs of a Florida resident's estate is not an easy job. In fact, it is one that can span for years, especially if a person is in charge of handling the distribution of assets at certain times. Though representatives may have instructions on how to handle estate administration, claims against the estate could still result.

Executors need to have the time to properly complete probate

Before taking on an important position, most people will determine whether they are well suited for the role. For some reason, this does not always take place when a person is asked to become the executor of an estate. In many cases, Florida residents will agree to take on this role without fully knowing what it entails. Before taking that route, individuals may want to consider their abilities and willingness to go through the probate process.

Some executors may have to sell real estate during probate

When agreeing to act as the executor of an estate, many Florida residents may not know exactly what they are getting into. The overall probate process can be complicated for anyone, and some estates may have assets that make settling affairs even more difficult, like houses that need to be sold. Handling real estate when closing an estate can be a complex aspect of this process.

Many surviving loved ones have questions about probate

It is normal for many questions to arise after a loved one's death. However, it is often better to obtain answers to those questions before the person's passing, especially because the person may be the best one to provide those answers. Of course, that is not always possible, but it does not mean that Florida residents cannot obtain the answers they need regarding probate questions.

Executors must handle the fees associated with probate

When a loved one leaves behind a will as part of a Florida estate plan, that document needs validating by the court. This step is a part of the probate process, which also entails settling the decedent's final affairs. If the will designated an executor, this person has the responsibility of handling the tasks involved in the process, including taking care of the associated fees.

Asset distribution a touchy part of estate administration

Asset distribution is an important part of closing a Florida estate. However, there is a time for making such distributions, and it typically takes place at the end of the estate administration process. Of course, surviving loved ones who have had their eyes on certain items or who have been bequeathed items may try to get those assets sooner.

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